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We’re so thankful for all you did to help orphans in 2018! As you can see below, you’ve brought life change to orphans and their caregivers in Russia, India, and Kenya. For additional information, click the infographic.

God is opening some new, big doors of opportunity to reach even more orphans in 2019, and we hope you’ll be part of this growth.

These are located in the Vladimir and Khabarovsk regions of Russia.

These saints are the hands and feet of Christ, ministering to the abandoned. It is our privilege to support them with humanitarian aid, training, resources for Bible teaching, prayer, and more.

These are located in Russia (1), India (6), and Kenya (1). The average number of children in one of the private, Christian homes we serve is 13.

Of course, the bulk of our donations come from our home base in the Midwest, but the word is spreading!

It’s no surprise that generous Hoosiers lead the way, donating 2,318 of the total 3,401 gifts given in 2018. Next most frequent were gifts from Ohio, then Illinois, then Minnesota. Outside of the Midwest, Arizona lead the way, donating 61 times!

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These rankings are according to Open Doors’ world watch list. For information about how the rankings are determined and to check the rankings of other nations, visit: www.opendoorsusa.org/christian-persecution/world-watch-list

In 2018, we had participants from California, Florida, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin.

Education is crucial for orphans as many struggle to break a generational cycle of poverty. While Russia’s public education system is free and sufficient, our children in India and Kenya need private educations to one day be successful in the work force.

With 50% of our short-term team participants heading there.

These Russian children range in age from 3-17. Typically, they have no other means of hearing the gospel.

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Education is crucial for orphans as many struggle to break a generational cycle of poverty. While Russia’s public education system is free and sufficient, our children in India and Kenya need private educations to one day be successful in the work force.